Real Life Repossession Cases – Mrs B vs Kensington Mortgages

In order to help other home owners who are facing repossession, we are going to start posting actual cases.

These will be based on situations faced by people who have contacted us but of course, names and identifying information will remain hidden.

Case #1

Mrs. B
Location: Wakefield
Value of Home: approx £500,000
Total Mortgage: £108,000
Lender: Kensington
Second Charge: None
Loan Arrears: £24,000

Mrs B contacted us after receiving a Bailiff’s Warrant for Possession from her local county court on behalf of her lender, Kensington.

She had followed standard procedure to ask the court to allow her to pay her substantial arrears over 2 months. For this she used the Court Form N244. Because her court was busy the judge could only hear her case late on Friday morning, repossession by bailiffs was set to take place at 11am on Monday.

Normally, if a homeowner asks the court to help agree a repayment plan with their lender the judge will recommend that the lender accepts the plan and will suspend the repossession.

However, the judge can only suggest this to the lender.

In Mrs B’s case, the judge took on board the extenuating circumstances (serious illness in the family, coupled with a very low mortgage compared to property value and no other lenders involved) and urged the lender’s solicitors to ask them to accept the payment of £24,000 arrears over a 2 month period.

This is a large sum of money, but also a very short repayment period for the lender to agree to, and Mrs B was able to show that she could make these payments.

However, the lender refused the Judge’s recommendation and stated that only arrears payment in full before the bailiffs arrived on Monday would be acceptable. This was lunch time on Friday.

Unfortunately, Mrs B didn’t contact us until late afternoon on Friday.

If she had contacted us earlier we would have been able to arrange a cash buyer for her home with an option to buy it back later. Unfortunately, there was not enough time to even get ID documents to a solicitor before the repossesion was to take place on Monday morning.

To make matters worse, Mrs B had made a payment of £5,000 on the Friday morning, which instead of being money she and her family could use to find rented accommodation after the bailiffs repossessed her home, would only slightly reduce the overall amount owed to her lender, especially once the lender had added on its legal fees, penalties and costs of selling her home at auction, probably with a very low reserve just to cover their costs.

If you even think you might be facing a similar situation in the near future, seek advice now, because like Mrs B, you might believe that just paying arrears when you go to court will be enough to stop your lender from repossessing your home.

Increasingly, lenders are unwilling to accept arrears repayment arrangements because they fear that by not repossessing today and getting their money back, that your property may not be worth enough to cover your mortgage and loans if there is a property crash.

For more information on the repossession process visit our website Stop Repossessions Org

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